Char kway teow

Char kway teow, literally “stir-fried ricecake strips”, is a popular noodle dish in Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia.

It is made from kway teow which are 1 cm wide rice noodles, stir-fried over very high heat with light and dark soy sauce, chilli, whole prawns and other seafood, bean sprouts and chopped Chinese vegetables.

The dish is commonly stir-fried with egg, and slices of Lup Cheong (fatty Chinese pork sausage).  Char kway teow is traditionally stir-fried in pork fat, with crisp croutons of pork lard.

This low carb version uses zero carb Shirataki noodles.

firedKwayTao

BTW: The chilli blocks are made using Julie’s Chili paste block recipe on our blog.  But you could use commercial chilli paste too.

Print Recipe
Char kway teow
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indonesian
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 5 mins
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Indonesian
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 5 mins
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Put kettle on full with water. Prep Konjac noodles (We sliced konjac "lasagne" sheets to approximate the wide rice noodle look) put in bowl and cover with boiling water
  2. Crush Garlic, Slice Lup Cheong, Slice squid, Chop Buk choy
  3. Mix Soy sauces, sesame oil, erythritol with some white pepper
  4. Whisk eggs with fish sauce in a bowl
  5. Heat wok, with a spray of oil, cook 1/3 of egg mixture at a time to make a thin omelette. Swirl the wok to make the omelette as thin as possible.
  6. Slice cooked omelettes into strips same size as the "noodles".
  7. Put lard in pan and fry garlic until just starting to go brown, add sausage, prawns and squid and cook until prawns are just going opaque.
  8. While this is cooking drain konjac noodles
  9. Add Mung Bean sprouts, Buk choy and konjac noodles to Wok and stir fry until green leaves are starting to wilt
  10. Add chilli paste blocks and stir fry while mixing the chilli through the stir fry
  11. Add the soy sauce mixture a bit at a time to taste
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Notable Replies

  1. This looks and sounds amazing! :heart_eyes: If the erythritol is necessary, I'll have to wait until next month as I'm doing the Sweet Free challenge (no AS's) for this month.

  2. It's not necessary. The traditional recipe uses palm sugar.

    The Thai have a culinary concept called "Yum" which was explained to me as an ideal balance of Sweet, Sour, Salty, Spicy flavours. This is not a thai dish but I understand the SE asian culinary traditions have a similar principle.

    The Erythritol is just there to balance the sour of the fish sauce, the spicy chilli's, the salty soy sauce.

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