Pulled slow-cooked Beef in beer

One great ketogenic ingredient available in Australia is Bighead “No carb” lager.  One of our admins contacted the brewery , “Burleigh Brewery”  and they told us that they have developed a yeast that is able to continue to consume glucose and turn it into alcohol well after most other yeasts give up.

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Burleigh Brewery “Bighead lager”

You know what goes well with beer?  BEEF.  And Costco is currently selling Bolar roasts, which is a cut from the fatty shoulder of a cow.  There is a seam of gristle through it and the meat is tough unless you cook it for a long time.

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But look at the price.  It’s around AUD $11 per kilo (US$3.8/lb) – we usually have 100g per plate so for us that’s AUD $1.10 per plate plus low carb vegetables – that’s a very cheap meal.

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Pulled slow-cooked Beef in beer
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Slice the bolar roast into roughly 2" cubes of meat
  2. Get a pan smoking hot, put chunks of beef fat cap down to render out the fat and then caramelize all surfaces.
  3. Add 2 bottles of beer to a slow cooker, and bay leaves (we also added some lemon thyme to this batch). Add seared meat and cover with water.
  4. Cook for about 10 hours or until so tender that you can "carve" the meat with a fork.
  5. Pull all the meat into fibres so that they soak up the liquid which is where the real flavour is.
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Notable Replies

  1. Donna says:

    Frankly, that looks amazing! I need to give that a shot.

    It's interesting to see meat prices after the conversion rate.

  2. Terri says:

    Ummmm… I hate beer (I know, sacrilege!), but this might just make me have to try it a new way. Have you ever used a different low carb beer?

  3. larry says:

    Looks great. I don't mean to be a party-pooper, but it looks like you made 35 portions using two bottles of beer. If you had used regular old beer, rather than low-or-no-carb beer it would have added a total of about 20 grams of carbs to the entire recipe, slightly more than a half a gram per portion. In other words, negligible. So, I think you can probably afford to make this recipe with regular beer as well.

    Beer is actually an extremely low carb product, about the same percentage carbohydrates by weight as cauliflower. The problem comes from the portion size -- one standard bottle is more than 300 grams of beer, and about 10 grams of carbohydrates. But when used in cooking the amount of beer that makes it into each portion is much, much smaller.

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